Tag Archives: nikon

Nikon India and WWF-India Unveil ‘Wonders of the Wild’ Contest

In an exciting partnership, Nikon India and the Worldwide Fund for Nature-India (WWF-India) have launched the first-ever ‘Wonders of the Wild’ photography and videography contest. This initiative seeks to showcase the stunning biodiversity of India by inviting wildlife enthusiasts across the nation to capture its natural beauty through their lenses.

Open until March 3, 2024, the contest is designed to highlight the creativity and storytelling capabilities of individuals dedicated to wildlife, encouraging them to share the vibrancy of Indian wildlife through their work. It represents a significant opportunity for budding talents to exhibit their skills and emphasizes the vital message of conservation.

A distinguished jury, including renowned wildlife videographers and photographers Shaaz Jung, Latika Nath, and Kallol Mukherjee, will evaluate the entries. Participants are welcome to submit their work via the Nikon India website or Instagram, with the contest offering a range of exciting prizes.

Prizes include a Nikon Z 8 mirrorless camera, valued at INR 3,43,995, for the grand prize winner. The first runner-up will receive a NIKKOR Z 400mm f/4.5 VR S lens worth INR 2,93,995, and the second runner-up will be awarded a NIKKOR Z 180-600mm f/5.6-6.3 VR lens valued at INR 1,69,995. Additionally, the top 10 entries will receive merchandise from the WWF-India Nature Store.

How Canon, Sony and Nikon are fighting Deep Fake Images

With fake images and videos becoming more convincing everyday (like the Rashmika Mandanna fake video), tech giants have increased their monitoring to combat that menace. But now it is not only the tech giants, but camera manufacturers that are joining this fight by developing technology that will embed digital signatures in their cameras with new technology that can verify the authenticity of photos. Sony, Nikon and Canon are working on embedding digital signatures in their cameras that will act as the proof of origin and the integrity of the images shot by them reports Nikkei Asia.

The digital signatures are believed to contain information such as the date, time, location, and the name of the photographer who has shot the image. The manufacturers believe that this will restrict tampering and help the photographers and viewers to identify the credibility of the work. Nikon is expected to offer this feature in its mirrorless cameras, while Sony and Canon are expected to offer it in their professional line-up as well.

How does it work?

If you are wondering how does this work? Then the three manufacturers have agreed on creating a global standard for digital signatures, which will be made compatible with a web-based tool called Verify. This tool has been launched by an alliance of global news organisations, technology companies, and camera makers, will allow anyone to check the credentials of an image for free. Once the online tool runs through the image, it will display the relevant information if an image has a digital signature. If the image has been altered by AI, then the tool will flag it as having “No Content Credentials”.

Google, Intel doing their bit

Google, the biggest search engine globally is also doing their bit to help this fight. They have released a tool that adds invisible digital watermarks to AI-generated pictures, which can be detected by another tool. Intel has developed technology that can analyse the skin colour changes of subjects in images, which indicate the blood flow under their skin, and use that to determine the image’s authenticity. 

The Challenge?

The biggest challenge though seems to be the user journey where they will have to use these tools to verify the images and authenticity. Whether a user undertakes that journey remains to be seen. But it is clear that a tool/technology like this is much needed at this point with the increase of deep fake images and videos on a rise. 

Sony is expected to release this technology by 2024 as per reports and Canon is expected to make it available later this year. Currently this embedding is expected to be available only for images, but reports suggests that Sony and Canon are considering adding the feature to videos, although under development.